Tag Archives: films

The song Alfie

Here’s a song that had me hocked since 1966 at 8 years old. Now a classic Jazz standard. One of those songs that moves through my life and enhances the human experience. Making life lovable in troubling times. The original film Alfie is a sweet film with major dangerous life lesson learned. Michael Caine is beautiful. Shelly Winters’s character is one that I can now relate to more thoroughly in my feminine older years. The song Alfie is a deep and reflective song. Originally song by Cher when she was a rather unknown street singer/ musician. Yes, they, “Sony & Cher,” did hang out with Rodney Bingenheimer. Who cares after all these years.

“The title song, “Alfie”, written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David, was sung by Cher over the film’s closing credits in the US release. It became a hit for British singer Cilla Black (Millicent Martin sang Alfie on its British release) and for Madeline Eastman and Dionne Warwick. Numerous jazz musicians have covered it and it has become a jazz standard.”

Here is an interesting example or another jazz standard interpretation that I found lovely of the song Alfie.

The Gals and Michael Caine in Alfie (1966)


Alfie (by David K. Mathews featuring Amikaeyla) from DAVID MATTHEWS — Fantasy Vocal Sessions Vol.1 Standards released 2018.

A song for the heart. Always good to hear.

 



https://www.jazzmusicarchives.com/album/david-matthews/fantasy-vocal-sessions-vol1-standards

A “Cinderella Liberty” is Navy jargon for a pass that runs out at midnight…

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John Baggs Jr.: Would you call yourself a “Champagne cocktail-sippin’, cock-teasin’, downtown barroom whore?

Maggie Paul: [bursting into tears] Second generation!

At that time in my life I never looked at the possibility of poverty and prostitution as a way for a woman to be independent

We saw this film in 1973. We applied the usual antics of youth getting into films when we were all under age for an “R” rated film. It was the same year that the Exorcist came out. Most likely we viewed this film at the Fallbrook Theater that still had a large Cinemascope screen. I know it is the same theater where we saw the Exorcist. This is before greed stepped in, before they started butchering the theaters up into multi-viewing-rooms, at least this one.

John Baggs Jr.: We love each other.

Maggie Paul: Love is shit with sugar on it.

Basically, the film is about a sailor, John Baggs Jr., on “Cinderella liberty” due to a boil on his behind. He gets time off and in the process the Navy loses his files. He then goes on patrol street duty. He also does what sailors do he finds a prostitute, Maggie Paul. The film is very entertaining and made a big impression of me at 15. It has a good feel to it.

At that time in my life I never looked at the possibility of poverty and prostitution as a way for a woman to be independent. Also, I learned that the world of a sailor is a tough life. Somehow these two characters find each other and fall in love. There is more to the film though, it is also about Maggie’s child Doug.  Imagine a punk kid, who drinks beer to ease his toothache, winning John’s heart over. It is true and then the three of them forming a family especially in such an unpredictable environment. Who would know such a sweet family would develop?

The sleazy bar scenes, playing pool, and the colorful and cleaver dialogues; are brilliantly married with this film’s soundtrack. It has that ‘70s thing going on…the real deal!!

James Caan and Marsha Mason in Cinderella Liberty (1973)

Honey cooler

Wipe that smile off your mug!

~ Eddie Kagle

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Tony from 1932 Scarface

I just saw Angel On My Shoulder on TMC, (http://www.tcm.com/). starring Paul Muni, Anne Baxter and the infamous Claude Rains. Wow what a winner. The film is based loosely on the motif of Faust by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, which is the old story of making a deal with the devil. Romance is a tight theme in this film too and as in Faust it is love that outsmarts the devil once again !

What is so endearing about this film is how Paul Muni’s character Eddie Kagle talks the gangster talk. He has it down. He is an amazing gangster actor to study. I have viewed a few films with Paul Muni over the years, as the 1932 Scarface,  but this one really gets me. Ya, I’m a sucker for them bad boys.  Next to James Cagney and Humphrey Bogart… I prefer Paul Muni!

So sit back with some giggle water and rest your lambs on some Joes or should I say trouble boys… all the way!   This film is well worth your time!

http://www.sagedragonfly.com/sayings/1930s_slang.htm