Category Archives: PUNK NO-stalgia :Punk Rock

Hell Doc has the vital spark!

8 years Stig Stench of Stench Radio


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Sig Stench The Hell Doc has been raising the punk dead for 8 years. What a strange necromancy it has been. He really did catch the nostalgia of the original punk scene.  It started for me around 2004. I felt it in my bones and punk rock soul. Many clubs and people felt it too I assume. This a major span of about ten years. That did get the punk dead up and moving. The first show that got it going for me was the Mau Maus playing the Redwood with opening band A Pretty Mess. All ages of punks came together 70s, 80s, 90s punks. It was a tight bunch. I was hanging with Joe singer of Jughead’s Revenge that night. Tequila Mockingbird was there before her Punk Museum started up. Bob Canto 90s Flipside shit worker was there. In time we went to the Redwood I saw Diana Cancer before the reforming of 45 Grave, I saw Steve Human hanging outside staying away from the alcohol and Cake Flipside 90s staff too. It was the first time I felt the punk revival happen.

Mike Atta (RIP) Middle Class

Before this was Mr. T’s in Highland Park. (Now a hip bowling, food bar) So many bands came through the club. We started seeing bands there around 2006 to 2008 more or less. Seedy and a fun place to be. I hugged the toilet there. Our 16-year-old was old enough to babysit our little one. So, mama and papa had some fun on the weekends. It saved our marriage in many ways. Infusing our life with old and new friends. We saw the Urinals and Mike Watt play there. Master Cylinder and Carnage Asada too.

We Got Power event picutre by Hudley Flipside 2012

We were tight with the band The Million Kids and I went on to do Flipside Fanzine 2010 with Billy and Joe for a few issues before they moved onto Spark Plug fanzine. Yet it really hit me hard when I was at Kaiser Permeate in the San Fernando Valley. Walking by me I saw a mid-aged guy with a GBH shirt.  I said to him, “I know those guys, Jock. Colin and Ross.” (at the time I had not met the new drummer Scott)

Bass player of Love Canal, Bob Gnarly punk rock history galore..

He said, “Great they are playing Ventura Theater this month.” A spark of tenacity filled me. I looked up GBH and found Colin Abrahll’s email. Their second tour in some time. My oldest son and I saw them. That was another turning point for me. My spine found joy and friendship in that old sound of bass and guitar and beyond.

Hudley Flipside Punk Show 2010

Then there was locally in the San Fernando Valley, where I live.  Cobalt Cafe, The Scotland Yard and Weber’s had all sort of bands come through in 10-year time. The Krum Bums, The Weirdos, Symbol Six. Also, at Weber’s I got to see a sacred evening with the Adolescents and the Middle Class. My old-time punk buds from the original Los Angeles punk scene.

Martin Atkins Punk Museum Event

While all this was happening around 2010 I met Stig Stench of Stench Radio . He interviewed me on his show and I did and an interview with him for the 2010 Flipside. It was fun. All those good old feeling game back of belonging to the punk scene. I think we all jumped into it all too fast and all at once. Some got splashed on and others got quick sand. It was a bit of a nightmare at times.

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The Weirdos at the Cobalt Cafe… the mighty Dix Denney

At around this time, I lost both of my parents and went through menopause.  I would ride around in my dark blue Chrysler M playing my car radio “Mike Conley” loud, smoking too many cigarettes and acting like a spoiled teenage child. Yes, my kids would hide my cigarettes from me. I got some stupid tattoos as well.

At Mr T’s Bowl with Shane (RIP), Hudley and Falling James a few years ago. Picture by Bob Cantu https://www.facebook.com/bob.cantu1

Since then the festivals have taken over and the local clubs closed or are further away. I don’t like driving or do not feel the need to make the long drives. The Cobalt closed, The Scotland Yard has a new owner (I am grieving the loss right now) and Weber’s was demolished due to asshole mosh punk pricks. (Like the Canoga Park Punk Rock Swap Meet Scene. They say it’s for charity. . what a line of bull)

The ascending bell curve of punk nostalgia was a fun ride and celebrating that is  Hell Doc, my pet name for Stig!  Never jumping off the nostalgia ride means a hell of a lot to me. He has tenacity and my friendship. We wrestled a few times too.

Lots of original punk bands have been playing the last ten years. Decry, Love Canal, Doggy Style, and many to the 10th degree more. Old friends that I still chat with now and then. Some of us are are not talking.

Opening night at The Punk Museum…

I guess over the last ten years there is a singular motif that many new and old friends tell me. Guys that are anywhere from 30 to 50 years old. They say this…

“When I was a young kid, I was all alone and the only thing I had was Flipside. I made connections with other punks and bands.” Or “You published my first record review, or I wrote my first this or that in Flipside!”

DJ Joe D at the ‘Yard

I am happy because that is what the scene was all about then. We got to face it now that the punk scene has made changes with modern times like technology. . What matters most to me is the 10 % punk rock experience. Also the friends made in the scene.  One of my long-time friends Steve Hart from the (Order of the) White Rose punk band said he met band members though the classified section of Flipside. He invited me to write some stuff for his current publication New Wave Chicken. A long time friendship and it has only been through correspondence.

Jordan Schwartz having Fun at the Punk Museum

Any way a lot of good things happened along the path of the last ten years. Stig Stench is one of them. He can tell you all the punkers he has interviewed on his radio show and all the bands he does support and helped out. And that is what punk is all about also. Making friends, listening to music, and giving a voice to the voiceless. And to all the new punk bands … it is so groovy.

 

 

 

 

Fun times at the Scotland Yard with Dancing John and the Tender of the Brew.. Mr Funk

Hey, the punk scene gave me a voice and something I bet you wished I would shut the funk up about. I love you all.

 


– fin-



 

Us Against the World

If you’re hungry for nostalgia
Make sure it’s your own
Seeking inspiration
origin unknown
You’re happy stealing thunder
When metal starts to rust
Memories still linger
Monochrome and dust.

Year zero has returned last
Respect is to be earned / The lesion
To be learned
It’s us against the world.

The years are mounting up now
For them plagiarists
It’s really makes you wonder
Why they still exist
Not sold like a good thing
We were built to last
Take the easy option
Reinvent your past.

Just a bad facsimile
Without the vital spark
Running with the big dogs
But you ain't got the bark
Far beyond a tribute
You wanna take the credit
If I got to explain it
You ain’t never gonna get it.

Rest in skate heaven

Turning 60 is all about going to visit the chiropractor. It was the pogoing or the slam pit that done me in.

Sitting in the coffee job and listening to the retired men talk about how they read the obituary section every day made my dancing john and I laugh. It isn’t funny when it is a comrade from days long gone by.

Like Julie of Sin 34.

I remember asking her once a question when we first met. She was the talk of the town. She was bright, skated and was a singer of a punk rock band.

“So, you skate board?”  I asked her.

“Ha Ha Ha… do I skate board, yes on a board, but I think you mean do I skate!”

Two generations merging in a scene where terms changed fast. It was never easy confronting and talking to punks. Julie laughed loud and held her own in a scene that had some tough competition. Boys everywhere. I captured her voice in a little article called Feminine Influences I put in Flipside issue 39. Our six-year anniversary issue.

Rest in skate heaven!!

Feminine Influences (2)

Feminine Influences Flipside 39 Aug/83


Who knows and beyond?

It was the year 2038, The old purple haired broad walked slowly down the street. On a big monitor above her she saw that old Flipside Logo. Now part of an advertisement campaign for public office. Those people running for office with pig hearts. And she thought it was weirder when she heard the Ramones’ song as part of a bike exercise commercial back in 2018.

After about 14 years over reflecting, reliving, and watching all the Flipside stuff I help produce become dissected, rearranged bought and sold and resold I can now let it all go. T-shirt logos and documentaries too. I came out with my own D.I.Y. publications to tell my story. It has been out for over a year or two.

Yes, I have been asked to tell my story in other people’s books. Some I did because I felt the need to save the memory of Flipside. Not anymore. I let it go. This is a reality that I had to face and it was not easy letting go of the need to protect Los Angeles Flipside Fanzine.

“It may be bad, but it feels good”

I hope others that were part of Flipside tell their own stories in their own way. Who knows we could put together a blog or book that includes our individual stories as writers, shit workers, photographers, people who caused considerable trouble etc. That would be fun.

One thing that shines through as a truth that Al and I believed in…. “You don’t have to ask permission.” If you want to do it just do it. “

So, letting it go means just that. You don’t have to ask me if you want to use this or that from Flipside’s vast products in anything you are doing. Just do it. I will not be part of that anymore. It is not my responsibility.

Yet, I do have my projects if you need to see what it was like for me as a Flipside punk person. A simple story that I did in my little bedroom converted into an office. Where I do my art, poetry and writing of all kinds, so be it. It took me 2004 to 2017 to finish the Punk@lullaby project. Just like condensed soup but a condensed punk rock story.

To all my old & new friends of the Big Punk Rock @ beyond.

~ Hudley


https://hudleyflipside.com/my-shop-get-my-weird-stuff-here/



Taking the back door into UCLA or remember sneaking in the bathroom window to get into shows for free?

I did not know that this two-day event was the first of it’s kind at UCLA. Yet I naturally follow Joe Strummer’s advice, which is to move naively into things. I think of this as letting the essence or spirit of an event unfold as it may. This is how I fell into punk rock. The right place at the right time. It was synchronicity and all that unconscious revealing by focus and experience.  For me, as others, it was the first note of a song. The guitar riff or bass depth and drums ripping though my spine. It made me wake up!

I wanted to attend the full event but didn’t because of my bad back and family responsibilities. I attended the full event on Saturday. I made as many of the sessions as I was able to. Each session inspired me to see from a different perspective. Some of the panelists are very academic. Their blending punk with thesis was a challenging reality for most of them. Also, the need to archive punk, in general, was something that challenged all of them. I have questioned this one myself. I was hoping that by being here that some of my questions might be answered. Their augments are satisfactory. Over time, I will consider all of them.

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Session 2B ”Punk Epistemologies, 9:30 to 10:30 AM was my first session to focus my mind on.  I listened actively to Sarah Gelbard speak about punk as being “neutralized,” or “ask a punk,” and “ask a punk academia.”  She is a PhD candidate. She defines herself as a punk planner and architect. A punkarchitect! She said the Academy, conformity to institutions or university, does reject her feminist and or punk attitude. The title of her presentation, “Ask a punk: from informality to anti-formality and anti-authority and when to say fuck.”  I felt an irritatingly shy stirring in her that filled the room. I have not felt that feeling for some time. Her integrity and honesty moved me. She mentioned story telling may be a type of approach to her chosen field of study.

Robert Haworth was next, and his theme was on” radical learning spaces.” As an educator and practicing anarchist he shared some biographical stories about his punk rock experience. A theme that ran throughout his talk seemed to focus on building character. How society and educational (Academy) focuses a type of expendable economic character that forms our children. He mentioned a good book to study by Emma Goldman, “The Child and its Enemies.”

Session 5B: Punk Political Economies presented three panelists. What came forth here is that “We should consider continuing to support the cracks.” I enjoyed Kathryn Heffner speaking about women fanzine publishers of science fiction writing. Briefly I can say that I learned about the history of fanzines. She talked about the community formed by fanzines and how they communicated. It is about women and resistance. My heart about jumped out of my chest. She defined so many elements of what a fanzine is all about. It is about community, friends, and a subject.  The punk scene is about friends and the continuity of friendships over time. I did not hear much about this at this conference!  Kathryn did tell a short story about a sister zinester who misspelled a word and made a whole movement out of it. I about jumped up and screamed hallelujah. The point being that with fanzines the information is current and was often printed up quickly to spread like a good wild-fire of communication. I knew this to be true.  Her talk gave meaning to my community. We need to keep writing and self-publishing.

The final Session 21B. Decay, Ruins, Dystopias was very enjoyable and academic. S. Mark Gubb: “God So Loves Decay,” is an unusual perspective on achieving punk material. He is a PhD candidate. Simply put he had a friend read lyrics as punk poetry, UK Decay, in front of beautiful architecture in London (England… there abouts?). This is presented as performance art. My insight into what he said is that the archiving of punk repertories can inspire others to be creative. Taking archived material and recycling its essence to a new generation to use creatively.

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The Lyrics of UK Decay, Performed by Russ Crimewave

Michelle Gonzales presentation made a strong comparison between George Orwell and Joe Strummer. Her brief history of punk, music and films as influencing a generation of punks is a bit superficial to me. Yet her argument was sound and interesting. I noticed how she compared their lives and their life long intentions. As she suggested, I am going to Goggle the best of Utopian literature and do some reading. An honest look and what can move someone! A book and or a song.

Overall, I did not include everything from this punk academy conference. Yet in general I had a great time. My impression is that archiving punk is a very sound perspective and a reality for some such as Slash Magazine and Maximum Rocknroll. I am not sure If I am ready yet to turn over my stuff. (as a friend said to me, “Take it out of the dusty garage” or something like that ) Time will tell.

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Mixing the Academy and lived PUNK culture is a concept like a giant punk rocket filled bulging with repertories of sight and sound. A giant punk rocket to the future that explodes into the sky like a fucking loud scream to a new world of fireballs and resistance…. women indulgently included!



 

In moonlight
Danced through the night
Dancing in the white light
Freedom from conditioned trance
So stand so grand in decadence

And the white light
Danced through your stomach
Pulls tight
Tight pulls the chords of your empty heart

In decadence
The dance of decadence
Defiant stance - a new decade
Of decadence
Realise your personal destiny
Fighting the fat and prosperous
Brood of mediocrity
Once safe in its prosperity
Now burns
In decadence
The dance of decadence
The cry of truth - a state of mind -
Call it youth

Take up your part in the play
Decapitate the day
White eyed - hatchets high - luddite like
In decadence
Decadancing - you can be your own king
You can be your own king
In the dance of decadence
Deca-deca-deca-decadance

1 – 16 Los Angeles Flipside Fanzine Covers

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Doing some research and writing and thought I would add this to my site… goes well with the other gallery Flipside Fanzine Covers I have up here.


Flipside Issue 1

First Issue issue sold through the mail was to Kristian Hoffman (from the Mumps) ~ Pooch

DATE: August 28, 1977. FORMAT: 8 1/2×7” Xerox PAGES: 20 PRICE: $.25. PRESS RUN 100 STAFF: AL, Lash, Tory, Pooch, X—8.

Flipside Issue 2

DATE: Oct. 1977. FORMAT: Shitty offset, 7×8 1/2″ PAGES:20 PRICE: $.25. PRESS RUN 200 STAFF: AL, Lash, Tory, Pooch, X—8.

Flipside Issue 3

“ART SCHOOL ISSUE”

DATE: Nov. 1977. FORMAT: Xerox, 7×8 1/2″ PAGES: 20 PRICE: $.25. PRESS RUN 100 STAFF: AL, Lash, Tory, Pooch, X-8.

Flipside Issue 4

DATE: Nov. 1977. FORMAT: Offset, 7×8 1/2″ PAGES: 20 PRICE: $.25. PRESS RUN: 300 STAFF: AL, Dean Ded, Larry lash, Pooch, X—8.

Flipside Issue 5

ISSUE # 5 DATES: December 1977. FORMAT: 7×8 1/2″, offset PAGES: 20 PRICE: $.25. PRESS RUN: 300 STAFF: Al, Dean Ded, Larry Lash, Pooch, X—8.

Flipside Issue 6

DATES: January 1978. FORMAT: 7×8 1/2 PAGES: 20 PRICE: $.25. PRESS RUN: 400 STAFF: Al, Dean Ded, Larry Lash, X-8, Pooch.

Flipside Issue 7

DATES: March 1978. FORMAT: 8 1/2×11″ Offset PAGES: 16 PRICE: $.50 PRESS RUN: 400 STAFF: Al, Dean Ded, Larry Lash, Pooch, X—8

Flipside Issue 8

DATES: May 1978. FORMAT: 8 1/2×11″ Offset PAGES: 16 PRICE: $.50 PRESS RUN: 500 STAFF: Al, Pooch, Dean Ded, Lash, Gaby, Pete, X—8

Flipside Issue 9

DATES: August 1978. FORMAT: 8 1/2×11″Offset PAGES: 16 PRICE: $.50 PRESS RUN:500 STAFF: AI, Pooch, X—8, Pete, Gaby

Flipside Issue 10

DATE: November 1978. FORMAT: 8 1/2×11” Offset PAGES: 16 PRICE: $.50 PRESS RUN: 400 STAFF: AI and X—8

Flipside Issue 11

DATES: November 1978. (Flipside Calendar for 1979) FORMAT: 7 1/2×5″, offset PAGES:28 PRICE: $1.00 PRESS RUN:500 STAFF: Al, X-8, Gerard, Gerber

Flipside Issue 12

DATES: January 1979. FORMAT: 8 1/2×11, offset PAGES: 16 PRICE: $.50 PRESS RUN: 500 STAFF: Al, X-8, Angola

Flipside Issue 13

DATES: January 1979. FORMAT: 8‘1/2×11, offset PAGES: 24 _. PRICE: $.75 PRESS RUN: 500 STAFF: AI, X—8, Angola

Flipside Issue 14

DATES: April 1979. FORMAT: 8 1/2×11, offset PRESS RUN: 700 STAFF: Al, Nate, Jill, Paul Problem, Lois, Angola, Gerard, and X—8

Flipside Issue 15

DATES: July 1979. FORMAT: 8 1/2×11, offset PAGES: 24 PRICE: $.75 PRESS RUN: 800 STAFF: Al, Jill, Paul, Angola

Flipside Issue 16

DATE: October 1979. FORMAT: 8 1/2×11, offset PAGES: 24 PRICE: $.75 PRESS RUN: 1000 STAFF: AI, Paul Problem, Jill and Hud (cover)


Denis, Pat and Mike, The PUNK HUB MASTERS

THE PUNK HUB MASTERS

My talk today is a comparison essay about three characters from the early punk rock scene.

A Punk Comrade GHOST Special.

Dennis Danell original bass player for the punk rock band Social Distortion, Pat Fear singer and guitar player extraordinaire of the mockery punk band White Flag, and Mike Conley singer of the popular  punk band MIA. I call them the PUNK HUB MASTERS

To move my essay into the realm of where I am looking from, I will be using a concept from my favorite psychologist Carl Gustav Jung. Now for a short Jungian psychology concept…

“The specific role of the archetype in synchronistic phenomena seems to be to serve as the constellating hub of a situation across time,and to be the factor of [inner order]  that gives this distinctive set to the situation.”

Punk rock is a phenomenon which created a situation of order as a constellating hub. A hub is a focal point a center around which other things revolve from which things radiate. I am applying this concept to the origin of punks and to punk rock…

We were nobodies of the underground, sitting on a youthful explosion, that was a rip-tide of good-fella punk friends. The early individual punks found each other through the hubs we created. Back in the late 70s and throughout the 80s, as you know the punk scene created a network of hubs that worked independently from each other, yet depended on each other to sustain the punk scene.

Examples of hubs were Fanzines such as We Got Power or Flipside Fanzine. Also, every punk band had its own hub. Record labels, music recording studios and record store hubs. The major places to make the scene!  Such as Licorice pizza, ZEDS, Tower Records and Moby Disk Records and our own Whittier Record hub Lovells Records.  Without forgetting the college and underground radio program hubs where the innovative music played. These were the greatest of supportive hubs such as Pat Hoed’s Adam Bomb (KXLU), Stella Stray POP and Rodney on the KOQ.

The major hub that brought us all together was an amazing force know as gigs. The garage to Club 88, the Masque to the Whisky A go go and beyond. Where the fans, bands and promoters met!

The focal point here was the paper flyer. These papers were handed out at gigs. Unique band flyers with local and logo band art. Mostly Xerox copies. Xerox machines a revolutionary major hub for the punk scene.  The US Mail and the ring ring telephone press buttons or circular dial extenuated the positive communication hub…remember? Punks spent a great deal of time alone…creating, practicing, and thinking in our own hubs! Coming together via shows, the phone and the mail.

This is where the hub masters such as Denis, Pat, and Mike were found. They shined there. They masterly brought all the HUBS together. These three punks were genius hub masters. Networking was their punk underground gift and they are authentic examples of the early punk rock phenomenon.

Dennis, Pat, and Mike are a part of the Southern California punk scene. They influenced a generation of fans and often are not known or acknowledged for their influence.

They infected my little hub of a bedroom converted into a fanzine office. I often felt overwhelmed working on Flipside and under a big wave of stuff always about ready to crash. These guys showed me the skills of synchronizing things together. Making it seem easy.

Number one Punk Hub Master: Dennis Danell

I first saw Denis when I was living with my sister in Fullerton Orange County. It was 1978. I was working at a local Dry-Cleaning Business as a cashier. Staffing on Flipside Fanzine on the side. He was riding a sting-ray bike sporting a spike haircut. At that time is was unique. We were speaking the same language. I looked similar with my partial shaved hairdo with orange hair color. A year later we met at the scene and become friends.

Dennis taught me loyalty of friendship. I witnessed his expansive heart that made his band stay tight. This is the work of the hub master. Denis still visits me in my dreams. Always polite, honest, and his happy Dizzy self. He had the ability of synchronizing punks together in a charming way. He will not ever be taken for granted. He was at the right place at the right time.

I will read some quotes from Flipside 20 A Social Distortion interview. I feel these short quotes embrace his character.

“Denis: We wanna sound like no one else, We wanna sound like us!!”

“Denis: Tommie’s chilly burgers. I ate one of those and didn’t have to eat for 2 days and I was shitting for 3 weeks!”

Second Hub Master: Pat Fear.

As you know Pat was a force to deal with. He lived in Riverside which was not far from Whittier Ca where Flipside Fanzine was based. Flipside put out a few music vinyl fanzines on Flipside / Gasatanka Records.

Pat was the hub master and helped bring it all other. Was it only a few years ago I argued on Facebook about his hate for Sahara Palin? I would ask him to slow down and redirect his energy. White Flag played a show with the Simpletons around 2008. They played a Saints Song, Demolition Girl. A nice dedication to me. Yet that was Pat… he always tried to make his friends happy. He was humorous in an irritating and funny way. He had the gift of inclusion. He is a constellating hub across time which brings us all here together today.

I will read some quotes by White Flag Tape 6 Flipside Music Fanzine. I will try to read them the way White Flag said them. Pat Fear’s high degree of sarcasm.

This is a White Flag moment.

“What is the purpose of White Flag?”

“To create an illusion of creativity. Because we are too good to be believed.”

“White Flag is a band that’s done everything done before… but better.” “There are two kinds of people in the world, people who are in White Flag and all those who wish they were.”

“White Flag is more than just a band it is a concept of how to live your life.”

“We look like women, talk like men, and play like mother fuckers. (twisted sister quote.)”

Pat wrote a theme song for our video fanzines. I’d like to share a short description from our catalog describing the beginning of Flipside Video Number Two,

“Now if you want to see the good old video monster in action you just got to catch this video. So, if you get it, and put it in your VCR, you might just die. Because the opening Flipside Video Number Two is the band White Flag. Gutsy and pure, Pat Fear will knock your block off while he plays guitar for the opening theme song called “Flipside” with backup singers including some Redd Kross members and one Bangle member …”

Third Hub Master: Mike Conley

Mike originally came from Las Vegas and then stationed his band MIA in the Orange County beach area. He brought punks tighter together. He did this at parties, gigs or at the Flipside House. He could wheel and deal the punk zone. Back stage Mike would make me laugh. He would follow me around saying,

“Want a cocktail, Hudley,” while rolling his eyes round and around. Just like Groucho Marx.

In 2008 when editing my memoirs about the punk scene I came across some Mike comments in a Flipside Fanzine Interview with his band. Unbelievably I received a call at that moment from Nike Adams, a member of MIA, telling me of Mike’s demise.   A week later at his funeral his oldest daughter told us a short story.

She said that when they were traveling in his car her dad always had the music on too loud. She told him he could use head phones like everyone else. He never did. That’s punk.

I will now read another short quote from my Punk@lullby Journal Number Four.

From the Pogo to the Slam Pit

Recently, at a benefit show for the passing of Mike Conley of M.I.A., a slam pit broke out at the Detroit bar in Costa Mesa. After about 19 years my natural feelings of irritation and perspiration filled with moisture above my brow. In the past, the slam pit became a testosterone-filled ring of jock bodies circling round and round before the stage. Bouncers and bands tried to control it.  They could not stop this wildfire. I grew to hate it. Yet, the recent show again proved me wrong. There were some women but mostly men dancing around having a great time. Yes, their firm bodies now had become a little soft around the edges, as one middle-aged guy stopped and said to me, as if Mike Conley for one moment materialized,

“…enjoy this moment, it is the best time of your life!”

This guy was beaming with youthful glee.

Flipside produced one of MIA’s albums entitled After the Fact. I will read lyrics from a song that Mike wrote. A Quote from the Song, Whisper in the Wind,

“In my eyes you’ll see a thousand memories He said stare into my soul All of me you shall know Live your life full, live your life free, Tomorrow’s but a vision, Yesterday is a dream…”

Mike had the quality of inner order. A quality of depth and control that was not always easy to access.

This concludes my essay on three punk rockers of the early Southern California Punk Scene. The Denis, Pat and Mike I knew were extraordinary. They were our friends!

They are the Punk Hub Masters!


(I presented this at Pat Fear and Other Stories~ December 3, 2017 )


For more punk rock reading pleasure you can buy my DIY Punk@lullaby Journals One through Four at the link below. 

https://hudleyflipside.com/my-shop-get-my-weird-stuff-here/

 

 

 

 

PUNK@LULLBY DIY Journals one-four.


My Punk@lullaby Journal One

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8 1/2 by 5 1/2 Booklet. Beginning Journal of a punk rock chick from the San Fernando Valley who became a co-editor and publisher of the underground punk Los Angeles Flipside Fanzine 1979 to 1989.


My Punk@lullaby Journal Two   $6.00

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8 1/2 by 5 1/2 Booklet. The continuing memories of the early punk scene as well as Hudley’s life and adventures. The next journal three will be out in Mid-April 2017.


My Punk@lullaby Journal Three  $6.00

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8 1/2 by 5 1/2 Booklet. The continuing memories of the early punk scene as well as Hudley’s life and adventures. Drugs and foolish love Issue. More to come out…


My Punk@lullby Journal Four

$6.00
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Copy number four cover

8 1/2 by 5 1/2 Booklet. The continuing memories of the early punk scene as well as Hudley’s life and adventures. The tape recorder Issue. I dedicate this issue to the one and only tape recorder we used at Los Angeles Flipside Fanzine. On the cover is one of my favorite pics of the early punk scene with Subhumans (Canadian Band) and Samoans. Greg Turner, Metal Mike, Wimpy, Hud, Gary and Jim. I am holding Flipside’s tape recorder. Picture by Al Flipside.

The last journal


What Noisy Cats We Are…

Lewis McAdams: In those days cool was a survival mechanism.

I made a mistake. I thought the cover was of Bob Mould of Husker Du but instead is Ed Crawford, aka ed fROMOHIO from Firehose. Thanks goes to We Got Power: David Markey. Makes sense to me…

Big Frank asked Al if I was on the cover of issue number 50. He seemed a bit bugged. Al said no that is ed fROMOHIO of Firehose, they have an interview in the issue by Jon Mastumoto. It was our July 1986 issue. Purple cover ta boot. I saw no resemblance besides being a Noisy Cat.  We were pleased with the cover.

Comrades of fanzine Ink Disease put up their interview with, “the Du” and so I felt a need to join in today. So many bands, fans, and contributors galore. Like I said before, there were many hands in the cookie jar. When we lose a friend from that tight matrix of friends of the punk scene we naturally mourn our loss, but we also share in their brilliance! When they lived with us on this short earth adventure. Wild music and rebellious dear friends, Grant Hart you are one of the cool guys.

SW LAUDEN: We exchanged our work…

Last Sunday I met up with an author S. W. Lauden who told me he became a writer because of his first  published item in Los Angeles Flipside Fanzine in the mid ’80s. It is good to hear inspirational stories. I was happy to know that. A nice continuity even though I did not guess that punk rock would find me at an event dedicated to Lewis McAdams in celebration with Friends of the Los Angeles River.

 

People talk about anarchy
And taking up a fight
Well I’m afraid of things like that
I lock my doors at night
I don’t rape, and I don’t pillage
Other peoples’ lives
I don’t practice what you preach
And I won’t see through your eyes

You want to change the world
By breaking rules and laws
People don’t do things like that
In the real world at all
You’re not a cop, or a politician
You’re a person too
You can sing any song you want
But you’re still the same

I can’t think of anything
That makes me more upset
People talk all this rhetoric
Forgive but not forget
I don’t rape, and I don’t pillage
Other peoples’ lives
I don’t practice what you preach
And I won’t see through your eyes

The early punk scene

“It was bound to happen, with so much media coverage of ‘punk’ fashion’ Time, Newsweek, New West etc.… well the punk fashion show was held at the Palladium you all know the story…”

Flipside Issue 4 Nov. 1977, Press run 300, 25 Cents.

Terry was scary and hardcore, before the term “hardcore Punk” became a cliché.

Devo, Blondie, and my favorite The Avengers played this gig. 1976 to 1979. Those years flashed by, It was during this time, during my metamorphosis into becoming a punk; I remember a couple of times I met Terry. First time was at the Punk Fashion Show….

Looking forward to speaking this Sunday…

 

https://www.facebook.com/events/810875865754408/

My Punk@lullaby Journal Four Is Now For Sale

Los Angeles Flipside Fanzine is not forgotten. 

Copy number four cover

This was my concern in 2004 when I began my memoir about the punk scene I was passionately involved with.  That Flipside Fanzine would be forgotten. How many punk rock books are now being sold today that mention Flipside? Enough to satisfy me. My Punk@lullaby Journals, one through four, are part of this memory. As I repeatedly say, “There are many stories from the big punk rock. Mine is just one of them. Mine is a complimentary edition to read alongside the big punk rock books out there!”   My Punk@lullaby Journals share in the tapestry of the whole worth of what the original Los Angeles punk scene was and has now become! Yes, I have heard the echoes of “another old punk rock story.” This is ok for me to hear now! I can ”transform it into something of value!”  It is good for an elder to share stories about life. This is an ancient archetype that I have taken on.
I did approach others to have my book published. I answered my need to publish it by doing it myself. All that I leaned from the original punk scene was available to me. My mind and soul, a computer and printer and a bedroom converted into an office. The integrity of Flipside Fanzine shines through these little numbers I call journals. All four journals I published myself. I’m happy! As I move into turning 60 I’ve done something of value by completing my project. I now share my journals with the public.  I was close to 30 when I left the original punk scene! That terrifying year was 1989. Yes, all that first Saturn return and second Saturn return jazz is happening as I write this post now. A continuity that I also share for those that study the oldest of synchronicity wise sciences.
My stories are not perfect stories. If you desire to buy one, or all four, I hope while reading and reflecting on my stories you will find some good values for yourself.  It was an extraordinary time and we were wild free journalists documenting a scene. No one told us what to do. We were punks publishing a punk ‘zine. We were running with a tight but growing punk scene. Nobodies of an underground culture. All individuals were unique yet part of a community of rebellious friends. I still endure the punk scene.

I have always believed, and I still believe, that whatever good or bad fortune may come our way we can always give it meaning and transform it into something of value.       ~Hermann Hesse

My Punk@lullaby Journal Four can be purchased on the link below…

My Shop

https://hudleyflipside.com/my-shop-get-my-weird-stuff-here/